From Pakistan, With Love

postwhitesociety:

angelabassetts:

Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

Women of Color in Dramas
American Violet  (2008)
Brick Lane (2008)
Desert Flower (2009)
Dreams of Life (2011)
Heaven on Earth (2008)
I Will Follow (2011) 
Skin (2008)
The Patience Stone (2013)
Things Never Said (2013)
Yasmin (2004)
Women of Color in Friendship/Family films
Arranged (2007)
Chutney Popcorn (1999)
Eve’s Bayou (1997)
How the Garcia Girls Spent Their Summer (2005)
Radiance (1998)
Real Women Have Curves (2002)
The Joy Luck Club (1993)
The Sapphires (2011) 
Tortilla Soup (2001)
Waiting to Exhale (1995)
What’s Cooking? (2000)
Women of Color in RomComs
It’s a Wonderful Afterlife (2010)
Miss Dial (2013)
Young Girls of Color
Akeelah and the Bee  (2006)
Anita and Me (2002)
Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012)
Life, Above All (2010)
Linda Linda Linda
Rabbit Proof Fence (2002)
Wadjda (2012)
Whale Rider (2002)
Xiu Xiu The Sent Down Girl (1998)
Yelling to the Sky (2011)
Queer Women of Color
Pariah (2011)
I Can’t Think Straight (2008)
Saving Face (2004)
Spider Lilies (2007)
The Journey (2004)
The Peculiar Kind s1 & s2 (web series) 
Yes or No 1 & 2

postwhitesociety:

angelabassetts:

Film masterpost highlighting the stories of women of color. Representation of women of color in film is quite scarce, so here are some films I think showcase a wide range of perspectives and experiences that we don't get to see on our movie screens. 

Women of Color in Dramas

Women of Color in Friendship/Family films

Women of Color in RomComs

Young Girls of Color

Queer Women of Color

(Source: napsnotesandknots, via angrywocunited)

“Organised bands of armed Hindus — some from groups tied to Modi’s party — fanned across the state seeking revenge against Muslims for allegedly burning a train full of Hindu pilgrims a few weeks earlier. The Hindu rioters systematically sought out and destroyed Muslim homes and businesses, killing more than 1,000 people. Muslim women were singled out. According to many Indian and foreign sources, including a Human Rights Watch account and a report by an international research team called ‘Threatened Existence: A Feminist Analysis of the Genocide in Gujarat,’ women were stripped, gang-raped, often publicly, and in almost all cases then burned or hacked to death. The reason the violence reached such extremes was that the state police stood back and did not intervene to stop the attacks by Hindu fanatics and even told victims that it could not protect them.”

—   

Please tell me again how Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi is your feminist icon from India for denouncing rape when he allowed this to happen under his watch.

Do enlighten me, liberals. I’m waiting.

(via vul-va)

(via randomactsofchaos)

“This is why Kiki had dreaded having girls: she knew she wouldn’t be able to protect them from self-disgust. To that end she had tried banning television in the early years, and never had lipstick or a woman’s magazine crossed the threshold of the Belsey home to Kiki’s knowledge, but these and other precautionary measures had made no difference. It was in the air, or so it seemed to Kiki, this hatred of women and their bodies - it seeped with every draught in the house; people brought it home on their shoes, they breathed it in off their newspapers. There was no way to control it.”

—   Zadie Smith (via irresponsiblewanderlustofthesoul)

tw-koreanhistory:

The Women Outside (1995)

They’re called bar women, hostesses, or sex workers and “western princesses.” They come from poor families, struggling to earn a decent wage, only to be forced into the world’s oldest profession. They’re the women who work in the camptowns that surround U.S. military bases in South Korea. In 40 years, over a million women have worked in Korea’s military sex industry, but their existence has never been officially acknowledged by either government. In The Women Outside, a film by J.T. Orinne Takagi and Hye Jung Park, some of these women bravely speak out about their lives for the first time. The film raises provocative questions about military policy, economic survival, and the role of women in global geopolitics.

The Korean War ended in 1953, but 37,000 American troops remain in South Korea to defend against possible invasion from the North in this, the most militarized region in the world. Around each of the 99 bases and installations are camptowns filled with bars, clubs, brothels — and over 27,000 women. Like migrant laborers, they work long hours for a meager base pay of only 200,000 won ($250 US) a month. The income barely covers food and rent; many become trapped in the camptowns as they struggle to pay off their ever-spiralling debts. Some dream of marrying U.S. military men and getting a fresh start in America. But even for those who find American G. I. husbands, resettling in the United States usually means confronting racism, anti-immigrant sentiments, a new way of life — and even ostracism from the Korean American community. The divorce rate for these Korean-American marriages is a staggering 80%.

It took Takagi and Park months to persuade current and former sex workers to speak out. “It was difficult getting them to talk, and extraordinary that we were allowed to film their faces,” says Park. The Women Outside focuses on several women, all of whom share a fierce determination to survive despite the discouraging odds. One of the film’s central characters is Yang Hyang Kim, who applied for a job in what she thought was a coffee house, only to be sold to a brothel outside Camp Stanley. She tells her wrenching story on camera with remarkable candor. After her first sexual experience in the brothel, “I felt like dirty woman,” she recalls, wincing at the memory. She tried to commit suicide, but another woman stopped her. “Physically I’m not a virgin,” she says softly. “But mentally I try to keep my pure heart.” When she finally escaped from the brothel, her family rejected her — shamed by her experience. Yang Hyang ended up returning to the camptowns.

The Women Outside also features interviews with representatives of South Korea’s women’s movement, Korean scholars, and U.S. Army personnel. The film charges that, working together, the Korean and American governments have allowed the camptown entertainment industry to flourish at the expense of countless Korean women. According to the film, priorities are heartbreakingly clear: all prostitutes are forcibly checked every two weeks for venereal disease, and regularly for H.I.V.; the soldiers are not. “If prostitutes and prostitution were really so natural, why does it require so many decisions by military commanders, why does it require so many negotiations?” asks Cynthia Enloe, professor of government at Clark University. Military prostitution, she maintains, “is not natural. It’s negotiated — it’s got as long a memo trail behind it as the fanciest weaponry.”

For some, the consequences are deadly. Yoon Kum-Yi, a sex worker, was brutally murdered in October, 1992 by Kenneth Markle, a U.S. serviceman stationed at Camp Casey. When Korean women’s groups organized massive protests, Markle became the first American soldier ever tried in Korean criminal courts. He was given a life sentence — though it was later reduced to 15 years.

(via sunborn-sundered-sound)

blkintellectual:


On August 11, 1965, after years of harassment and brutality at the hands of the police, the citizens of Watts initiated a major urban rebellion which lasted for five days and cost the city of Los Angeles $40 million in damages. Despite the perception that Blacks were merely “destroying their own neighborhood,” most of their rage was directed at the police and other public officials, as well as white-owned businesses in the area that tended to exploit, overcharge, and extract wealth and resources from the Black community. Following the uprising, the Watts community experienced a cultural and political renaissance as groups such as the Watts Writers Workshop, Watts Prophets and Watts Arts Studio helped establish Los Angeles an important nexus in the Black Arts movement on the West Coast.

blkintellectual:

On August 11, 1965, after years of harassment and brutality at the hands of the police, the citizens of Watts initiated a major urban rebellion which lasted for five days and cost the city of Los Angeles $40 million in damages. Despite the perception that Blacks were merely “destroying their own neighborhood,” most of their rage was directed at the police and other public officials, as well as white-owned businesses in the area that tended to exploit, overcharge, and extract wealth and resources from the Black community. Following the uprising, the Watts community experienced a cultural and political renaissance as groups such as the Watts Writers Workshop, Watts Prophets and Watts Arts Studio helped establish Los Angeles an important nexus in the Black Arts movement on the West Coast.

(via afro-dominicano)

“1. When the man at the bus stop burns holes in your skin raise your armour darling, your words are your weapons - tell him you are not a piece of meat, and his masculinity does not make him a lion. Darling, you are not his to prey on.

2. When the men in the car speeding down the road hurl fowl profanities at you, remember that this is not a show but your life and you are not an attraction for their eyes to feast upon.

3. Darling, a few years from now when your daughter comes home with warm tears running down her cheeks please remember that her shelter has not yet been built and she will allow you to enter for now - appreciate this, use this wisely. Do not allow her to go to bed with self-hatred in her veins and self-blame in her heart. Pay no mind to her attire, draw her attention away. Teach her that her outfit is not her consent. Teach her that her voice matters. Teach her to roar. Your words will echo in her mind and years from then her daughter will hear the same echo. You are a part of a movement. You are creating an army of powerful women. Darling, put on your war paint.

4. Baby, you are not a delicate flower, you are a lioness who’s beauty is in her self-belief, in her self-worth and in your ability to survive in a world where the odds are against you.

5. You are the sun’s burning rays.

6. You are the moon’s gentle glow.

7. Put on your war paint.”

—   M.K.,7 Things To Remember
(via aestheticintrovert)

(via aestheticintrovert)

neworleans-unknown:

remember-when-we:

remember-when-we:

reblog spread the word

SPREAD THE WORD IM TIRED OF THIS COP BRUTALITY ON US BLACK FOLK GET THIS NOTICED

This gotta stop

neworleans-unknown:

remember-when-we:

remember-when-we:

reblog spread the word

SPREAD THE WORD IM TIRED OF THIS COP BRUTALITY ON US BLACK FOLK GET THIS NOTICED

This gotta stop

(via itsmyrayeraye)